Pop, Girls, Etc.

Well, I guess it’s time I did something like this. Blogging as a whole is pretty stupid, I agree. And the people who do it have way more free time than the suckers who read the posts. And let’s not forget the self-entitlement of the bloggers who think their mundane everyday shit is worth publishing. But hey, it’s only costing me some hosting and I’ve been paying for that (and not using it) for years. My free time is also very limited so why not waste it by writing incoherently about things so obscure that even the vagrants of the smallest corner of the Internet would find them boring. This beats playing online chess, so it’s a start.

During the opening of the movie High Fidelity, based on the Nick Hornby novel of the same name, annoying Dick mentions to an irritated Rob while opening the Championship Vinyl record store, that he found a new Liquorice Comfits album over at Vintage Vinyl that was never released in the US, it was a Japanese import only. He then offers to tape the album for Rob, since he liked their second one, Pop, Girls, Etc., the one with Cheryl Ladd on the cover.
Isn’t that nice of Hornby? Sneaking in a fake band with fake albums in a book and a movie just to accurately describe the hardships of males everywhere.

I’ve come back and thought about this album title a lot of times in the last ten years and after seven or eight of those years I think I finally cracked it. If you’re one of those people who put things that make you feel rather than think or just do at the forefront of your life, then you can’t have your love life just be. You have to pick at it and unravel it and rebuild it all over again. And just never stop doing it, or else you risk getting bored. You can’t sort yourself out and get married and have kids and a secure desk job since that would come against your very nature. So you’re left jumping from rock to rock until you’re too old to do it anymore and end up dying alone. It sounds scary. And it is. But it’s not really that bad.

So then, why come back to “Pop, Girls, Etc.”? Because what else is there, really?

Of course, this isn’t a review of High Fidelity, either the movie or the book. I’ll get ’round to that some other time.

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